What is a wiki?
A wiki is a collection of web pages designed to enable anyone who accesses it to contribute or modify content, using a simplified markup language. Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites and to power community websites. The collaborative encyclopedia Wikipedia is one of the best-known wikis. (Wikipedia).

Wikis' easy-to-use (WYSIWYG--what you see is what you get) software allow us to easily create websites and they allow others to collaborate in building and editing them. Wikis may be one page or multiple pages. You can easily see the history of a wiki under the History tag. Vandalism can be easily detected and traced to a login or IP address, depending on the particular wiki configuration. Discussion is possible under the Discussion tag. Wikis may include a variety of embedded widgets (little program applications) including interactive maps, calendars, videos, slides shows, etc.

Wikis in Plain English


Cathy Jo Nelson on Wikis


New Tools for School Librarians (PB Wiki video)

New Tools for School Librarianship Wiki




Wikis
(the killer app!)


Background


Uses:
For pathfinders
1.1 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry.
1.3 Respect copyright/intellectual property rights of creators and producers.
1.3.2 Seek divergent perspectives during information gathering and assessment.
1.3.1 Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information.
1.3.4 Contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community.
1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly.
2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.
2.1.5 Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems.
3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.
3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
4.1.7 Use social networks and information tools to gather and share information.


As a library website / homepage
2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information.
2.1.5 Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems.
3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.
3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
4.1.7 Use social networks and information tools to gather and share information.


Booklists and Reviews
Common Belief: Reading is a window to the world.


Widgets (so many little apps to add to our wikis!)


Archive Student Work
2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.
3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
4.1.7 Use social networks and information tools to gather and share information.


Managing and reflecting on the research process
1.4.1 Monitor own information-seeking processes for effectiveness and progress, and adapt as necessary.
1.4.2 Use interaction with and feedback from teachers and peers to guide own inquiry process.
1.4.3 Monitor gathered information, and assess for gaps or weaknesses.
1.4.4 Seek appropriate help when it is needed.
2.1.2 Organize knowledge so that it is useful.
3.1.2 Participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.
3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess.
4.1.7 Use social networks and information tools to gather and share information.


Examples:

Searching Wikis
1.1 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry.
1.2.4 Maintain a critical stance by questioning the validity and accuracy of all information.
1.3.2 Seek divergent perspectives during information gathering and assessment.


Why teachers should create and use wikis:
Whether it's for your own convenience, your work with learners, to enhance professional development, etc, wikis will help you:
  • Create an index to student pages.
  • Build class knowledge around a unit, vocabulary, etc.
  • Build an agenda for your team meetings, or faculty meetings.
  • To build instructional units with colleagues
  • To teach about effective web design
  • To teach skills relating to collaboration and negotiating writing
  • To archive student work, model projects
  • Because we know that learning is a social process


Why students should create and use wikis:
  • To collaborate on projects with other students in their classes
  • To learn about effective web design
  • To collaborate on projects with other students outside their classes
  • To build documents together
  • To learn about authority and source in online documents
  • To build collaborative and negotiation skills
  • To organize knowledge so that it is useful AASL Standards
  • To demonstrate personal productivity by completing products to express learning AASL Standards
  • To collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems AASL Standards
  • To use the writing process, media and visual literacy, and technology skills to create products that express new understandings AASL Standards
  • Because we know that learning is a social process


Why librarians should create and use wikis:
Whether it's for your own convenience, your library website, your work with teachers and learners and administrators, to enhance professional development, etc, wikis will help you:
  • Wikis make great pathfinders! (see Ten reasons why your next **pathfinder** should be a wiki)
  • To provide access to databases
  • To provide access to reference tools
  • As a quick way to organize your links to teacher and student projects
  • As a quick way for you to teacher teachers how to get a website started.
  • To archive student work, model projects.
  • Because we know that learning is a social process


Why administrators should create and use wikis:
  • To collaboratively plan staff, parent, student, and board meetings
  • To model use of the tools for your faculty and for students
  • Because we know that learning is a social process